3
Jun

What is the prize money for winning the Tour de France?

What is the prize money for winning the Tour de France?

Tour de France 2018 prize money: How much will riders and teams earn in cash and WorldTour points? The Tour de France may be one of the toughest endurance events an athlete can take part in, but when it comes to collecting their prize money after three weeks in the saddle riders are reminded of just how tough the sport really is. When Andy Murray won the men’s singles at Wimbledon last summer, he pocketed £2 million for just 15 hours and 52 minutes play, or around £125,000 an hour. By contrast, the winner at this year’s Tour will earn €500,000, or around £438,755, for cycling 3,540 kilometres (2,200 miles) over a gruelling three-week period. When you consider that tradition dictates the winner hands over his earnings to team-mates in recognition of their hard work, you start to understand what winning the iconic yellow jersey really means. The total pot of prize money handed out at this year’s Tour is worth €2,280,950 and while the eventual winner takes the lion’s share, there are plenty of other ways of earning a few extra euros.

Individual general classification prize money at 2018 Tour de France
Final position Prize money (€)
1 500,000
2 200,000
3 100,000
4 70,000
5 50,000
6 23,000
7 11,500
8 7,600
9 4,500
10 3,800
11 3,000
12 2,700
13 2,500
14 2,100
15 2,000
16 1,500
17 1,300
18 1,200
19 1,100
20 – 160 1,000
1
Jun

Silverstone Circuit: Disappointing rather than a thrill

Disappointing rather than a thrill

I visited Silverstone on the 01/07/17 for the Single Seater Thrill British Grand Prix live experience. Upon arrival it was clear as to where to go and the facilities seemed clean and well thought out. The briefing from the chief instructor was clear and entertaining which made me think that the experience out on track would be equally entertaining.

In regards to the actual on track experience it wasn’t made clear until you arrive at the track that you are not actually driving on the main Sivlerstone circuit but rather a test track tucked away at the rear of the circuit. When leaving the pits I found it very disappointing, you start by following a pace car in groups of 3/4 single setters, but because they have 3 groups each following their own pace car you never really get past 30mph for the first 10 minutes of track time and usually a lot less speed.

After 10 minutes the pace car pulls in but because you have 10 race cars driving around a relatively small circuit its difficult to get more than one quick lap in as you are limited to overtaking on the straight.
In summary if you want to race on a real circuit with plenty of space and pace then try Donington Park.

Your Day

  • Welcome reception and introduction to Silverstone
  • Drive workshop tour
  • Race control visit
  • Winners’ podium photo opportunity
  • Guided tour of the Grand Prix circuit**
  • Opportunity to purchase Silverstone official merchandise